Latest News

fuel smuggling

Illegal Fuel Smuggling Between Colombia & Venezuela Border

Rivers of gasoline flow across the desert border from Venezuela into Colombia’s La Guajira department, nourishing an immense illegal market and enriching a new criminal group that has replaced the old “caravans of death” in the fuel smuggling world.

Afraid, people only whisper about the powerful criminal group known as the Contraband Cartel (Cartel del Contrabando). It controls the area’s lucrative fuel smuggling business, whose product travels from Maracaibo, the capital of Venezuela’s Zulia state, to the city of Maicao in La Guajira.

Currently, fuel smuggling can generate up to $3 million in a single day along the entire Colombia-Venezuela border, according to a report by Cali media outlet El País. Once Venezuelan gasoline enters Colombia, the price of a gallon skyrockets to 3,700 times its value in Venezuela, costing between $0.84 and $2.07 per gallon.

When you first step foot in Maicao, La Guajira’s last city before entering Venezuela, two things become immediately apparent: the oppressive heat and the sale of small quantities of gasoline in “pimpinas,” plastic containers or rustic tanks with up to a five-gallon capacity.

The pimpinas have flooded the entire city, and the people who sell them, known as “pimpineros,” are the last link in the fuel smuggling chain.

The Contraband Cartel has controlled the area’s fuel smuggling business for roughly the past four years, starting after former criminal leaders Francisco “Kiko” Gómez, ex-governor of La Guajira, and Marcos de Jesús Figueroa, alias “Marquitos,” were arrested in 2013 and 2014, respectively (although it was announced that Marquitos could be released in 2018).

Maicao is the perfect place for the Contraband Cartel to transport and sell Venezuelan gasoline in the north of Colombia. InSight Crime spoke to sources in the area who said more than 70 percent of Maicao’s economy could be devoted to smuggling.

The city shares an extensive border with Zulia state in Venezuela, which thousands of cars cross daily using the 200 or so unofficial routes known as “trochas,” residents say. According to area experts, about 25 cars could enter Colombia on just one trocha every day.

The same sources (who requested to remain anonymous for security reasons) have stated that at least half the trochas are used to smuggle gasoline, which adds up to potentially 2,500 cars headed for Maicao every day carrying an average of 47 gallons of fuel per car. That means approximately 117,500 gallons (434,750 liters) of gasoline could be entering the city on any given day.

The Contraband Cartel uses two main strategies to move its illegal product. It depends on cooperatives to legalize the contraband gasoline, a process locally referred to in Spanish as “lavar,” playing off the Spanish term for money laundering. They then sell each gallon at the retail price in La Guajira (currently around $2.07). The criminal group also sends gasoline-laden cars to a town in the same department called Cuestecitas, which is located in the neighboring municipality of Albania and has an enormous market for illegal gasoline sales.

But these strategies are not new; they were copied from the criminal organizations that had already run the region’s smuggling before: the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia – AUC) and the criminal network headed by Kiko Gómez and Marquitos Figueroa, the latter of whom is a powerful criminal with ties to smuggling and drug trafficking in Venezuela.

In 1999 one of the AUC’s most important commanders, Rodrigo Tovar Pupo, alias “Jorge 40,” took over Maicao and seized control of all the contraband moving through its municipal borders. The paramilitary group turned criminal band controlled La Guajira until 2006, when it demobilized. As InSight Crime reported, Jorge 40 used a cooperative known as Ayatawacoop to launder his contraband gasoline. Because the co-op had legal permission to trade gasoline, it could sell the product to multiple filling stations throughout Maicao.

When the AUC demobilized in 2006, Gómez and Marquitos essentially continued with the same activities. But they did not use the cooperative just to launder their illicit gasoline, they also ran their own gas stations in the tiny border town of La Paz, in Cesar department, expanding their control of the contraband business until 2014.

The duo managed to move convoys of up to 150 cars from Maicao to La Paz. The massive lines of cars were known as “caravans of death” due to the inherent riskiness of the business they represented.

For more information on Security Services in Venezuela please contact us.

You may also like

el salvador force

MS13’s Crooked Finances Brought to Light

MS13 is quickly becoming known throughout the Americas. The group is known by Security Services El Salvador for its violent behavior and is thought to be on the verge of gaining much more ground than they have previously enjoyed. One recent discovery in El Salvador can be seen as proof that MS13 is gearing up […]

vista plaza Venezuela 2

Data Shows That Lynching Is Up 650 Percent in Venezuela

According to official data, a major rise in lynchings has been reported in Venezuela as of September 2016. This is a great increase when compared to 2015 statistics, that only showed there to be ten lynchings in 2015. However, this report stems from the Ministry of Internal Affairs, Justice and Peace, and others report the […]

Russia World Cup 2018

Security for 2018 World Cup Russia

International sporting events always pose a significant security threat, and none more so than this years FIFA World Cup tournament in Russia.  With President Putin looking set to be re-elected in March 2018, the tournament could face it’s toughest security challenges yet. Russia, and the Putin administration in particular have often courted controversy, and this […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *